Tag Archives: 155-11

HIV and Politics

Human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV is the virus which causes AIDS. In the 1980s and 1990s, the treatment, prevention, and research AIDS became politicized. The political issues surrounding HIV/AIDS ranged from debates over federal funding for scientific and medical research to arguments over “immoral” behavior being the root cause of the disease’s spread.
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The Evil Empire

Following a relaxing of Cold War tensions during the 1970s (leading to such things as the Helsinki Agreement, for example), the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in 1979 reignited fears and forebodings.

President Ronald Reagan, who owed his 1980 election–in part–to the perceived weakness of the Carter Administration in the face of Soviet aggression, gave this speech to the National Association of Evangelicals in 1983.
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Beyond Voting Rights: Voices of Power

Voting rights and integration were important goals of the civil rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s. After the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Act, emphasis within the movement began to shift to issues of economic inequality, police brutality, educational inequality, and other issues not easily solved with legislation.
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Nonviolence

Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., one of the leaders of the Southern Christian Leadership Council, urged the use of nonviolent means of protest in the fight for recognition of the civil rights of African Americans. In these excerpts from his April 16, 1963 “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” he defends nonviolent direct action such as marches and sit-ins as the surest means to “open the door to negotiation.”
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